Women’s Health Week: Put Yourself First

Too often, women put their health on the back burner. September 5-11 is Women's Health Week and this year the initiative is asking women to put themselves first.

Women’s Health Week aims to highlight wellness issues that disproportionately affect women, and to close the gender health gap.

While on average women live longer than men, they're more likely to suffer from one or more chronic health conditions.

Each day of Women’s Health Week focuses on a different topic and encourages women to stay up to date with health checks and prioritise physical and mental wellbeing. 

Monday: Check Me Out.

On average, women visit their GP seven times per year. However, women in rural Australia- with limited access to medical practitioners- are less likely to see a GP compared to their metropolitan counterparts.

Check Me Out encourages women in both metropolitan areas and regional Australia to stay up to date with breast checks, cervical screenings and general health checkups.

Tuesday: Menopause Matters.

Tuesday is all about menopause and peri-menopause. It aims to demystify the daunting changes that occur in the body and mind during menopause, whilst offering practical tips to cope with the transition.

Wednesday: Pelvic Power.

Wednesday is all about pelvic pain and pelvic floor strength.

Many women struggle with pelvic floor strength- particularly after childbirth, but around one in five women also experience chronic pelvic pain that lasts six months or more.

Pelvic pain can be caused by periods, endometriosis, IBS, muscle pain, or bladder infection and has a debilitating effect on everyday life and sleep.

Pelvic Power Wednesday offers resources and exercises to strengthen the pelvic floor and reduce pain symptoms.

Thursday: Mind Health. 

Mind Health day shines a light on women’s mental health.

One in six Australian women will experience depression during their lifetime and one in three will suffer from anxiety. Women are also more likely than men to suffer from PTSD and eating disorders.

Thursday’s events will focus on a range of mental health struggles that women face including anxiety, being a new mum, brain fog and dementia. Mind Health day asks women to prioritise mental health and seek professional support.

Friday: Move and Improve.

Friday explores the benefits of physical activity to the brain and body- encouraging women to make movement part of everyday life.

Cardiovascular disease is the number one killer of Australian women. Move and Improve is all about enhancing heart health through exercises that can be done at home and in the workplace.

Connect Health & Community offer a range of services to improve women's health. For information on counselling, diet and nutritional services, cardiac rehabilitation, exercise groups and social support, see here.

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